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The Legends of some Ondo Proverbs

  1. Oyinbo Ore: There was an assistant D.O in the former Okitipupa district superintending the Ore/Agbabu/Odigbo axis who attempted to convey a log of wood for building a house with a bicycle over some distance. Unfortunately he ran into a ditch and the log fell on him and killed him. That created the legend of:
    “O paa e bi s’oyinbo Ore yo mu keke gbe gedu”
  2. Lakulaku: There was a very strong but rather imbecilic young man in Ondo of yesteryears who could be sent on errands by just practically anybody. He was always running and never seemed to tire even when nobody was after him.
    Nearby villages did not appear too far for him as he was always seen everywhere appearing to always be in a hurry.
    That created the legend of:
    “Ki Lakulaku e se do fi ghen le y’Oboto ‘gba mefa d’ale i le?”
  1. Lalotan: Lalotan was another physically strong man in Ondo who was always in a hurry when he walked. He was a devotee of the god of Sango and whenever he was possessed of the Sango spirit, he became a man in a trance and completely dazed. Nobody could catch up with him. This created the legend that:
    “Ijo yi Sango e gun Lalotan, a le le, e bo; daibupen ……”
  2. Tuja: Tuja was one of the more reliable domestic servants of Lisa Alujonu Fawehinmi who finished a bottle of Gordon Schnapps at a gulp during a bet in Okelisa. The bet was that whoever could do this without stopping to catch his breath would win the handsome prize of one shilling! “Sile kan”.
    Of course Tuja finished the Schnapps but did not live to collect the prize as he prompt collapsed and died on the spot! This led to the legend of: “Me a w’aiye ya, din kuku ya bisi Tuja!”
  1. Eti yo ba ti a’jugbati, do kan ti sun, o ti awa ji wa m’ejo. (if one is predestined to suffer a hot slap, even if one has gone to bed for the day, the compelling need to mediate in a scuffle will certainly ensure this fulfilment!)
  2. Oigho yo ba ti a sun abata, do kan ko’li paanon, a jo n’oju’so. (again, if it is one’s ill-luck to be perpetually drenched in water, covering the roof of one’s house with long-span aluminium is no guarantee from this as the bedroom ceiling will surely leak at the points of nailings with the woodwork.) The two proverbs (5 & 6) illustrate in vivid perspectives, the immutability of destiny. No force can change the preordained destiny of man.

         Written by Taoheed Ajao

 

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