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Tradition

Ondo Kingdom – Why we are, where we are

There are some fundamental things that determine or dictate the way we are and to a great extent, what we do. In simple terms, this situation is believed to be affected by who your parents are, from whom certain attributes are inherited; the environment in which you live in terms …

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Ondo Kingdom Historical Landmarks

1510: Ondo town founded by HRM Oba Pupupu. 1516: Pupupu, the first Osemawe of Ondo (a lady), was installed. 1528: Oba AIRO the first male Osemawe and the first Son of Oba Pupupu was installed. 1590: Township development scheme began with the creation of two quarters, namely: Olurowo and Aruwa, …

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The Legends of some Ondo Proverbs

Oyinbo Ore: There was an assistant D.O in the former Okitipupa district superintending the Ore/Agbabu/Odigbo axis who attempted to convey a log of wood for building a house with a bicycle over some distance. Unfortunately he ran into a ditch and the log fell on him and killed him. That …

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Ondo Social Structure

Ondo Town: A C.M.S Mission was opened in Ode Ondo in 1875, and in 1877 the Rev. (later Bishop) Charles Phillips arrived. The Lagos government took an interest in Ondo, hoping to find a route to the interior of Yoruba country which would by-pass the area continually stricken by Ibadan-Egba-Ijebu …

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Superstitions and Misconceptions In Yoruba Culture

Superstitions and misconceptions are found in every nook and cranny of every society around the world, in the culture, customs, religion- be it traditional or modern day religions and Yoruba society is not an exception.   The word superstition originates from Latin word ‘Superstition’ meaning ‘standing beyond, outliving’. From the …

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Marriage in Yoruba Culture

Marriage is one of the oldest institutions among Yoruba, it marks the end and the beginning of a new era between two different individuals, who agreed to live together, and through their union creates everlasting friendship between homes of their birth. In times past, marriage matters were never left in the …

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Understanding The Antiquated Yoruba Oro Festival.

The word Oro means fierceness, tempest, or provocation, and Oro himself appears to be personified executive power. Oro is supposed to haunt the forest in the neighbourhood of towns, and he makes his approach known by a strange, whirring, roaring noise. As soon as this is heard, all women must …

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Are The Yoruba The Number One In Religious Tolerance?

When it comes to religion, are the Yoruba people of Nigeria the most tolerant race [tribe] in the whole world? It may not be wise to say yes because of the absence of any endorsement of such a position by a global body like the United Nations. But having travelled …

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